Home Boys' Lists Girls' Lists Men's Teams Women's Teams News Photos Contributors Links Help Sign-UpOnline Store
Latest News | Categories | Authors | News Archives
 
 

News & Features

Recruiting Profile
From Judo to Tennis, Luca Corinteli takes the lead
Share:   

Luca Corinteli has made it to the top of the national rankings and recently won the title at the USTA National Boys' 16 Clay Courts. It was his first Gold Ball for singles, but certainly not the only first prize he's taken. Corinteli has many trophies on his mantle from a sport that most tennis players know nothing about - Judo.

Blue Chip junior Luca Corinteli
© Marcia Frost, College And Junior Tennis
While most junior tennis players talk about starting to train when they were six years old, Luca Corinteli wasn't even thinking about the courts. His mind and training time were focused on judo.

"I fought judo for about seven years. I was pretty good at that," says the 16-year-old. "I won four Junior Olympic titles in a row. I was always bigger than all the kids my age, so when I was six I was winning in the eight-and-under; when I was seven I won in the nine-and-under; and when I was eight I won in the ten-and-under."

Corinteli was born in New York and spent his first eight years in the Queens borough of New York City. It's the area his parents moved to, but not where they are from originally, "Both my parents are from Georgia, just outside of Russia. My grandparents, uncles, everybody's from Georgia. I speak fluent Georgian, Russian and English."

When Corinteli was eight, the family moved to Alexandria, Virginia, and he left his judo coach behind. "I had an incredible coach there. He is someone I still keep in touch with," he acknowledges. It was about that time he began to think more about playing tennis, and the judo had to take a backseat, "I still love it. I still keep in touch with my friends I was doing judo with. It's an incredible sport. I still love it, but I don't get to do it, obviously."

As a 6'3", 210 pound tennis player, Corinteli finds advantages in his judo training.

"I think being a fighter - with that mindset - helps a lot in tennis. You have to battle the heat, your opponent, and sometimes yourself. You have to come out and do that every single day. I think judo helped me a lot."

This Article Is Available Only to Recruiting Advantage members
 
Please log in to access premium TennisRecruiting.net content.
LOG IN
User Name
 
Password
 
 
Forget your password?
 
Register Now For Free!
NOT REGISTERED?
Register Now For Free!
  • Content Updated Daily
  • Complete Rank Lists
  • Exclusive Articles
  • Recruit Interviews
It's Quick, Easy, and Free!
 

 
BECOME A FAN
 
  Help build our following.
 
  Follow us on Facebook
 
RECENT COMMITMENTS
8/29 Gunther Matta chooses California
8/27 Kiersten Cox chooses Belmont Abbey
8/27 Risa Nakagawa chooses Georgetown
8/26 Victor Pham chooses Columbia
8/25 Alex Wittenbaum chooses Marian (IN)
8/24 Yuki Asami chooses Pacific
8/23 Sera Martorelli chooses Army
8/23 Genevieve McCormick chooses Army
8/23 Arianna Spirtos chooses Army
8/21 Rianna Valdes chooses USC

Full Listings: Boys' Commits & Girls' Commits

 
 THE LATEST FROM TENNIS EXPRESS
8/31 Get the low-down on what @RafaelNadal would of worn at the #USOpen
8/29 Been following along for the #smashthesilence challenge? Get in on the action and rub elbows with the Djoker himself!
8/29 Federer looks dapper any time of day, but check out his NYC night look and see why his line is still going strong!
8/28 We're loving @milosraonic's bright @newbalance gear he's sporting at the US Open! Get the details in our gear guide
 
 

Page updated on Saturday, August 30, 2014
Contact our web team with any corrections