Home Boys' Lists Girls' Lists Men's Teams Women's Teams News Photos Contributors Links Help Sign-UpOnline Store
Latest News | Categories | Authors | News Archives

News & Features

Getting Started
Overview of the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Process

High school tennis players interested in competing in college probably know that they need to take care of their academics and athletics. But they should also need to understand the overall recruiting process. For players and parents interested in NCAA Division I or II tennis, below is a quick overview of the NCAA initial-eligibility process.


What Is The NCAA Eligibility Center?

The NCAA Eligibility Center (formerly the NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse) is a branch of the NCAA that determines a student's initial eligibility for athletics participation in his or her first year of college enrollment. Students who want to participate in college sports during their first year of enrollment in college must register with the Eligibility Center. Located in Indianapolis, Indians, the Eligibility Center staff follows NCAA legislation in analyzing and processing a student's high school academic records, ACT or SAT scores, and key information about amateurism participation, to determine the student's initial eligibility.


What Is The Cost?

There is only one fee to register with the Eligibility Center, which covers both the academic and amateurism certification: $60 for domestic prospects and $85 for international students.


When Should A Prospective Student-Athlete Register?

Register with the Eligibility Center at the end of the junior year in high school and be sure to update the athletics participation section regularly. There is no deadline; however, prospective student-athletes must be registered before they may receive an official visit at a Division I or II institution and sign a National Letter of Intent.


How Does A Prospective Student-Athlete Register?

To register with the Eligibility Center, simply go to www.eligibilitycenter.org. Click on prospective student-athlete, and then click on either Domestic or International Student Release Form. Complete ALL of the questions and submit your answers.


Eligibility Center Quick Facts


What Does A Prospective Student-Athlete Need to Do Before He/She Can Make an Official Visit?

  • Register with the Eligibility Center by completing the online Student Release Form.
  • Pay the registration fee.
  • Make sure the prospective student-athlete has taken the ACT, SAT or PSAT test.
  • Make sure all test scores and high school transcripts are sent directly to the Eligibility Center and the college the prospect is interested in visiting immediately after the student's junior year of high school.

Core Courses

16 core courses will be required for NCAA Division I prospective student-athletes to be certified.

16 Core Courses:

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
  • 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)
  • 1 year of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science
  • 2 years of social science
  • 4 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy)

Test Scores

All SAT and ACT scores must be reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center by the testing agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will no longer be used. When registering for the SAT or ACT, use the Eligibility Center code of 9999 to make sure the score is reported to the Eligibility Center.


Paul Parker has been Director of Compliance for the Georgia Tech Athletic Association since January 2006.


Leave a Comment


More Recruiting 101 Articles

Fall Signing Week '15: Keys to Success in Recruiting
I have been in the sports recruiting business for about six years now, and over the years I have seen some players successful in recruiting while others have struggled. The difference between those who end up playing college tennis and those who do not is not always who is a better player - but often who is willing to work harder and smarter than their competition. Check out my keys to success in the recruiting process.

Countdown: Avoiding Senioritis After Committing
There's no vaccine for senioritis, which makes it all the more imperative you take preventative measures against it. NCSA Athletic Recruiting gives tips on how to do just that.

Countdown: Should my Application Essay Include Tennis?
It's that time of year when high school seniors are preparing their college applications. One of the most important pieces you'll enclose in that packet is your application essay. As a junior tennis player, the sport has become a huge part of your life. It was certainly the main focus when you were writing to coaches and telling them how much you want to be on their teams, but does it belong in the college application essay?

 Recruiting 101 Index |   Subscribe


Coco Vandeweghe

Click on Coco Vandeweghe to view and buy her equipment, apparel, and footwear.
11/27 Yvonne Peters-Washington chooses Morgan State
11/26 Tim Ruetzel chooses Tulane
11/26 Sarai Monarrez Yesaki chooses SMU
11/26 Alex Knaff chooses Florida State
11/25 Jackson Cobb chooses Texas Tech
11/25 Hannah Dattilo chooses Oglethorpe
11/25 Rebecca Herrington chooses Lake Superior St.
11/24 Matthew Gonzales chooses Ottawa
11/24 William Piekarsky chooses Indiana
11/24 Adam Ambrozy chooses Columbia

Full Listings: Boys' Commits & Girls' Commits

10/09 Lighter than the RF 97 Autograph, and exceptionally maneuverable. Shop it here
10/09 Celebrating the changing of the seasons with some new tennis gear! #TreatYourself
10/07 If you're feeling pink we have a reward for you. A free bag! Click to find out more

Page updated on Friday, July 10, 2015
Contact our web team with any corrections