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Recruiting 101
What is the NCAA Eligibility Center?

The NCAA, or National Collegiate Athletic Association, was established in 1906 and serves as the athletics governing body for more than 1,300 colleges, universities, conferences and organizations. The national office is in Indianapolis, Indiana, but the member colleges and universities develop the rules and guidelines for athletics eligibility and athletics competition for each of the three NCAA divisions. The NCAA is committed to the student-athlete and to governing competition in a fair, safe, inclusive and sportsmanlike manner.

The NCAA Eligibility Center certifies the academic and amateur credentials of all college-bound student-athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division I or II athletics. To assist with this process, the NCAA Eligibility Center staff is eager to foster a cooperative environment of education and partnership with high schools, high school coaches and college-bound student-athletes. Ultimately, the individual student-athlete is responsible for achieving and protecting his or her eligibility status. How to find answers to your questions The answers to most questions can be found by:

  • Accessing the NCAA Eligibility Center's resource page on its website at www.eligibilitycenter.org, clicking on "Resources" and then selecting the type of student you are (U.S., International or home school). You can then navigate through the resources to find helpful information.

  • Contacting the NCAA Eligibility Center at the phone numbers found on that page.

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More Recruiting 101 Articles

Countdown: Transitioning to College Tennis
During my 35 years coaching tennis at the high school level, I played a key role in helping my players transition from junior tennis into college tennis. I was highly successful, so many parents over the years have asked me about my approach - and what I thought might be the key factors to success.

What Every Player Should Know Before Joining a College Team
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Page updated on Wednesday, August 10, 2016
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